Mountains in Catalonia

Congost De Finestres

One of the best ways to visit the mountains in Catalonia is by Kayak. The views are just amazing.

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The Congost De Finestres landscapes are incredible, and every turn you take is a different scenic view.

 

 

The trip can last up to 4 hours, and I suggest to take a packup and water with you, along with a cap and suncream.

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There are lots of wildlife to see while you are here including deer and Vultures.

Once you have been health and safety briefing you are left to enjoy your adventure and take your route.

 

 

 

And onced you have finished, you need to take a jump and a swim in the lake to cool off.

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The Muntanya de Sal

The Muntanya de Sal is a natural phenomenon in Cardona, Catalonia.

The salt mine had been mined since the Roman times and is now a popular tourist attraction.

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The tours lasts around one hour and it explains how the mountain is formed and the history of the miners.

 

 

 

 

 

For people who cannot understand Spanish or Catalan, there is an audio version for people to take with them while they are inside.

When you are finished, you can look around the site and also visit what Cardona has to offer including the castle and the town.

 

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Congost De Mont Rebei

Recently I visited the Congost De Mont Rebei, in Sant Esteve de la Sarga (Pallars Jussà), near Lleida, Catalonia.

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The path up the mountain is amazing, as you are walking on the edge and into the mountain itself.

 

 

 

 

It has to be one of my favourite places I have visited so far, and it has the most stunning views of the landscape.

For the more adventurous types, you can try kayaking int he river below and rock climbing.

You can also see pre-roman ruins from the 5th to the 9th century.

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